Skip to main content

Full text of "P & S ... : the yearbook of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University in the city of New York"

See other formats


k 



15 






i 



$00* 




K ..'ix. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Metropolitan New York Library Council - METRO 



http://archive.org/details/psyearbookofcoll1956colu 



X>r ^ . h i_' x-> , i -rriH 



THY Eternal Providence has appointed me to watch over the life 
and health of Thy creatures. May the love for my art actuate 
me at all times; may neither avarice, nor miserliness, nor the thirst 
for glory, nor for a great reputation engage my mind; for the 
enemies of Truth and Philanthropy could easily deceive me and 
make me forgetful of my lofty aim of doing good to Thy children. 

May I never see in the patient anything but a fellow creature in 
pain. 

Grant me strength, time, and opportunity always to correct 
what I have acquired, always to extend its domain; for knowledge 
is immense and the spirit of man can extend infinitely to enrich 
itself daily with new requirements. Today he can discover his 
errors of yesterday and tomorrow he may obtain a new light on 
what he thinks himself sure of today. 

O God, Thou hast appointed me to watch over the life and death 
of Thy creatures; here I am ready for my vocation. 

From the Oath and Prayer of Maimonides, 
Jewish physician of the twelfth century. 



19 5 6 



Published by the Fourth Year Class 

The College of Physicians and Surgeons 

Columbia University in the City of New York 




Carmine T. Vicale, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Neurology 



D E D I C A T ION 




To 

DR. CARMINE VICALE 
whose 

energetic and dramatic teaching 
illuminated 

the many facets of Neurology; 
and whose boundless enthusiasm for 
and interest in 

both patients and students alike 
will be remembered always by the 
Class of 1956. 





WILLARD COLE RAPPLEYE, 
A.M., M.D., Sc.D., Med.Sc.D. 

Dean 



AURA EDWARD SEVERINGHAUS, 
A.M., Ph.D. 

Associate Dean 




»-• A 




MISS ANNA SHACKLEFORD 
Secretory to the Associate Dean 




ADOLPH ELWYN 
1885-1955 



"The kindling spark consumes vs as it burns, 

Then far into the mystic night returns; 

How brief our slender tapers glow, 

How pale the fleeting rays they throw; 

The bard of Nishapur has said, 

No echo rises from the dead, 

Buf who has scanned that shoreless sweep 

And who has ever plumbed that deep? 

The corollary great has grown, 

The axiom remains unknown; 

There is no end, no death we can conceive, 

So lasting as the thread of life we weave." 

DR. HARRY H. SHAPIRO 





EDGAR GRIM MILLER, JR. 
1893-1955 



KENNETH B. TURNER 
1901-1955 



8 



IN AAEAAORIAM... 

Adolph Elwyn 

THE sudden death on June 9, 1955 of Dr. Adolph Elwyn brought to an end a 
lifetime of devoted service. He was perhaps one of the best known members of 
the teaching staff of the College of Physicians and Surgeons both in length of 
service which dates back to 1918, and in his wonderful ability to present compli- 
cated material clearly without confusing the student with unessential details. 

Dr. Elwyn will be remembered for his many accomplishments and admirable attri- 
butes; for his writings, for his qualities as a teacher and for his fine personal 
characteristics. 

If is impossible to imagine first year Neuroanatomy without Dr. Elwyn's masterful 
and energetic description of the pyramidal tract; his characteristic little cough and 
tapping pointer, and most of all, his thirst quenching from the water pitcher. Medical 
students to come will miss the great teacher, good friend and great man which the 
Class of 1956 was privileged to know. 



B 



Edgar Grim Miller, Jr. 

| ORN in Gettysburg, Pa., Dr. Miller graduated from Gettysburg College at the 
early age of 18. His graduate work was carried out in Columbia University, 
where he received the degree of Ph.D. in Biological Chemistry in 1913. With the 
exception of one year, 1913-1914, which he spent in Chicago as Instructor at the 
College of Medicine of the University of Illinois, his subsequent career was passed 
entirely at P & S, where he reached the rank of full professor of Biochemistry in 
1935. In 1953 he became Dean of the Graduate Faculties, an appointment which 
involved his departure from P & S. However, he continued to contribute to the lec- 
tures in biochemistry for students of medicine. 

Throughout the years he was universally regarded as the most effective teacher 
on our Faculty, for he possessed not only encyclopedic knowledge but a gift for 
exposition. His wise counsel was always available to students and colleagues. 
Through his utimely death, all at P & S have lost a beloved friend. 

Kenneth B. Turner 

A NATIVE of Lynchburg, Va., Dr. Turner received a B.A. from Hamilton College in 
1922 and his M.D. in 1926 from Harvard Medical School. He came to Presby- 
terian Hospital as an intern in 1926, and rose through successive appointments to 
become Director of Cardiology last year. He was an attending physician on Medical 
Service and an associate professor of clinical medicine at Columbia University. 

He had an unusual capacity for organization and had vision and imagination, not 
only for research, but in medical education and administrative affairs. He started 
the Group Clinic in 1946; reoriented the lectures to third-year students; and last year, 
completely reorganized the laboratory of electrocardiology. 

Rounds with Dr. Turner on the Medical Service were enjoyed by patient and 
student alike. His kindness and understanding was felt by all, while his eager teach- 
ing was ambrosia to the thirsting student. It's strange not to see Dr. Turner's gray 
hair in the second row of the eighth floor amphitheater during CPC and Team 
Rounds. His sudden death on October 9, 1955 has been felt keenly by all in the 
Medical Center family. 




President: Nelson Cortwell 
Vice Pres.: Mary Jane Jesse 
Secretary: Dick Prescott 
Treasurer. Bill Burkes 




10 



FI R 



tnn 



YEAR 






Front row — Sheldon Wolf, Martin Smith, Richard Linwood, Sheila Solomon, Barbara Hulka, Orlando Phil 
Miller, D. Verne McConnell, Warner Slack, William Munsie. Second row — Samuel Rosen, Arnold Schwartz, 
Peter Pressman, Donald Pugatch, Berish Strouch, Paul Wender, Bennett Simon, John Schieffelin, Roberto 
Quesen berry, Gamber Tegtmeyer, Maclyn Wosnitzer. Third row — Gene Phillips, Joseph Myers, Jr., 
Alexander McKinney, Thomas Plaut, Carlton MacDonald, Jr., Alexander Weech, Jr., Peter Mott, An sis 
Muiznieks, Paul Lietmon, Ronert Reiss, George Munsick, Alfred Moscarello. Fourth row — Fred Pitt man, 
Mary Jane Jesse, Lee Robbins, Xavier Sunyer, Bernard Ludes, Thomas Coats, S. Richard Prothero, Allan 
Rosen fie Id, Walter Mich el sen, David Widrow. Fifth row — Mark Mueller, Richmond Prescott, Edward 
Vadeika, David Nourok, George Wilson, Jr., Leonard Wheeler, Joseph Pines, Seymour Wallace, George 
Storm, Norman Roome, Arthur Rosenberg. Sixth row — Theodore Strehan, William Shaw, Charles Weems, 
Kenneth Spitzer, Robert Petersen, Paul Sigler. 




12 




Front row — William Burks, Manfred Epstein, Andrew Ferber, Fred London, Robert Collier, Kenneth Faust, 
Jessica Grosof, Lee Beh-gran. Second row — Ellyn Jones, William Applebaum, Edward Kaplan, John Foulke, 
Robert First, Peter Berkman, Teodoro Herskovic, Dan Cultier, John Gilfillan, Jr., Charles Hollander, Jean 
Keller, Third row — Peter Dunne, Beverly Goodman, Linda Hilles, Charles Davidson, Howard Cohen, 
Richard Druss, Robert Hillmon, Geoffrey Brittin, Richard Chase, Lester Baker, Earl Byrne. Fourth row — 
Harold Kundel, Stanley Ginsberg, LeRoy Costantin, Fred Allen, Jr., David Grainger, Jr., Cornelius Clark, 
A. J. Eleuteri, Jr., James Carter, Jr., Kendall Kane, I. Bradley Gordon. Fifth row — John Collins, Rud Barrett, 
William Benjamin, David Befeler, Guy Freeman, Donald Harris, Borre Gudmundsen, Dick Baum, Lud 
Gutmann, Mortimer Civon. Sixth row — George Ginsberg, I. Edward Kant 

Malcolm Edgar, Jr. 



Bob Jones, Burton McHugh, 




^TH0. 



13 



It's a beautiful day — damn it 




#' 



I 



*W 



# 



— psychological reassurance 



now just imagine the cell is a choo-choo train 




Will he survive? 




It's just about on inch behind the 
blackboard. 




■ ur 








t^ : ■■" 


Ir^lH ^r 


'i 



President: Bob Sherry 
Vice Pres..- Brown Dennis 
Secretary.- Mary Ellen Beck 
Treasurer: Charles Weave 




H 



COND YEAR 





" v. 




/ 

Li 



Top row — Arlan Jay Gottlieb, Thomas Quintan Morris, Charles Neave, Ralph Albert Pincus, A. Stephen 

Passloff. Middle row — William James Kane, Norman Lionel Kaplan, Paul Alan Kontrowitz, Byong Mok Kim, 

Alan Martin Lazerson. Bottom row — Harry Robert Crago, Jr., George Vincent Gift, Elena I. R. Ottolenghi, 

Joseph Kan tor, Homoyoun Kazemi. 



Top row — Robert Walter Sherry, William Strickland Weir, Richord Palmer Timmons, Robert Earl Schaefer, 
Herrick Clark Ridlon, Edwin Da go be rt Bronsome, Jr., James Ba Man tine Brown, Boudinol Stimson, Jr., 
William Snyder, Benjamin Barry Landau. Middle row — James D. Finkelstein, Phillip Zei den berg, Stephen 
Evan Malawista, Ernest Andrew Wacker, Daniel Lee Weiner, Lawrence Leslie Scharer, Carl Austin Weiss, 
Richard Merz Watson, Oliver Stevens Leland, Jr. Bottom row — Carl Meyer Pellman, Howard Philip Roffwarg, 
Elise C. Wechsler, Evelyn Birkeland Richter, Sim Warren Seides, Norman Talal, Harold Barry S level man. 





Top row — Kenneth A. Forde, Arthur Joseph Louis Strauss, John Sheriden Ashworth, Jerome Wayne Dougan. 

Middle row — Robert Goetz Campbell, Lawrence Perry Green, Jr., Andrew Henry Patterson, Uriel Shimon 

Barzel, James H. Hardy, 111, Lawrence Randall Boies, Jr. Boftom row — David Stern Friendly, Marvin Forland, 

Evelyn Gaynor, Harry M. Delany, Robert H. DeBellis. 



Top row — Brown W. Dennis, Korl Burger, Frederic Lewis Edelman, John William Bracket!, Jr., Thomas 
James Morley, Lawrence Walter Norton. Middle row — Stonley George Korenman, Daniel Joseph Collins, Jr., 
Gerard Alan Kaiser, Samuel Herbert Barondes, Paul Donald Harris, Lawrence Jurkowitz, Richord Wolff 
Brenner, Bert Stuart Horwitz, Richard Frederick Hnat. Bottom row — Arnold Gilbert, Herbert L. Cooper, 
Mary Ellen Beck, Ronald Baker Miller, Sheldon Harold Cherry. 












Peeping in on the second year class. 



Showed that we really had our hands in things. 



Left — Hosts of new textbooks. 
Right — the latest techniques. 



Left — and modern mechani- 
cal advances 



Right — enhanced our native 
abilities. 




22 




personal conferences. 



Left — careful search of "the 



Right — provided us with the 



straight poop. 




JIM I ! 




Left — Rouna table parleys. 

Right — well directed ques- 
tions, 



23 




The Faculty demanded blood 



and much was spilled. 




Though we were attentive 



and kept our eyes sharp 




and our fingers agil 



there was always The List. 



24 




and the furor continued, 




and nail-bite 



eceived their share of attention 







But there wos always the future. 



What, me worry? 



25 






President: Bob Bertsch 
Vice Pres.: Dwight Robinson 
Secretary: Marcia Bilbao 
Treasurer.- Don Gerber 




26 




THIRD YEAR 



-rr=t& 




Standing — Dennis Lafer, Steven Post, Fred Zuckerman, Harvey Zarem, Bill Wheeler, Simeon Pollack, 

Peter Wilson, Mayo Johnson, George Drake, Donald Gerber, Charles Faverio, Gene Bauman. Sitting — 

Charlotte Lafer, Susi Kessler, Judy Berg, Kay Richey. 



S tan ding — Roger Bo u lay, Paul Mooring, Stanley Ftnke, John Rathe, Moses Ma hoi, Robert Reilly, Charles 

Burckhart, Manuel Hinds, Bartlett Saunders, Carl Lyle, George Burnell, Sterling Tig nor. Sitting — Henry 

Buchwald, Peggy Vorhaus, Jean Smith, John Richardson, Alan Osborne. 




p f f & 9 

1 i 




Top row — Gene Kelly, Charles Bucknam, Robert Leach, Michael Lazor. Bottom row — Gerald Adler, Robert 
Ambrose, Morcia Bilbao, Leon Anderson, Normon Ertel. 



Standing — Dwight Robinson, Vincent Beltrani, Daniel Kimberg, Pier Moncusi-Ungaro, Robert Roven, 

Allan Jackman, Arnold Koff, James Mason, Frank Breen, Earl Hammer, Richard Bettigoie, Robert Kwit, 

Donald Harter. Sitting — Henry Metzger, Alice Gutmann, Ruth Ann Runyon, Steven Barrett. 





■Si 



jsts 

ttss 



I 






AS 



I 



L 







Tete a tete 






' 






. 



Ill 



■i'lis''. 



i 



Between acts 



IV- ' 



rw 



it 



Rogue's Gallery 




^o 



give you one more try 

1£4 



Town Club for Gentlemen 



*] 


u 




> 


More MD's drink 1 


Coca-Cola than . . 




Vital Signs a ten minutes 



The Oath of Hippocrates 

ISWI^HR by Hpollo the physician, & Aesculapius, & Hygeia, 
and Panacea, and all the gods and goddesses, that according to 
my ability and judgment I will keep this oath and this stipula-- 
tion: to reckon him who taught me this Hrt equally dear to me as 
my parents, to share my substance with him and relieve his necessities 
if required; to look upon his offspring as my own brothers and to teach 
them this Hrt, if they shall wish to learn it, without fee or stipulation; 
and that by precept, lefture, and every other mode of instruction I will 
impart a knowledge of the Hrt to my own sons and those of my teachers, 
and to dist.'ples bound by a stipulation and oath according to the law of 
medicine, but to none others. I will follow that system of regimen which 
according to my ability and judgment I consider for the benefit of my 
patients, and abstain from whatever is deleterious and mischievous. I 
will give no deadly medicine to anyone if asked, nor suggest any such 
counsel; and in like manner I will not give to a woman a pessary to pre 
ducc abortion. With purity and with holiness I will pass my life and 
practise my Hrt. I will not cut persons laboring under the stone, but 
will leave this to be done by men who arc practitioners of this work. Into 
whatever houses I enter I will go into them for the benefit of the sick 
and will abstain from every voluntary aft of mischief and corruption; & 
further, from the scduftion of females or males, of freemen and slaves. 
Whatever, in conneftion with my professional praftice or not in connect 
tion with it, I see or hear in the life of men which ought not to be spoken of 
abroad,I will not divulge,as reckoning that all such should be kept secret. 
While I continue to keep this oath unviolatcd may it be granted to me 
to enjoy life and the praftice of the Hrt, respefted by all men & all times. 
But should I trespass and violate this oath may the reverse be my lot. 



34 




H 



NIOR YEAR 



■^gr 




Vice-President 
ROBERT S. HIRSCH 
Lenox Hill Hospital 

New York City 



President 

WILLIAM C. HEADY 

The Genesee Hospital 

Rochester, New York 




Secretory-Treasurer 

JEANNETTE HOVSEPIAN 

Univ. of Illinois Research 

Chicago, Illinois 




36 




DAVID ANDREWS 

Presbyterian Hospital 

New York City 



PETER E. BARRY 

Hartford Hospital 

Hartford, Connecticut 





RAYMOND C. BARRETT 

Hartford Hospital 

Hartford, Connecticut 



HANS H. BARUCH 

The Mount Sinai Hospital 

New York City 



MARIANNE A. BEATRICE 

Grace New Haven Community 

Hospital 

New Haven, Connecticut 



PAUL H. BLACK 

Massachusetts General Hospital 

Boston, Massachusetts 




37 





L 






f <J*?^ -£T 






«**• •* 


' 




+-* 




^ 








^ 




f 







EDITH M. BRAMWELL 

Presbyterian Hospital 

New York City 




JOHN P. BRODSKY 

Bellevue Hospital 

New York City 



EDWARD O. BROWN 

Roosevelt Hospital 

New York City 



ROY E. BROWN 

Bellevue Hospital 

New York City 




ROBERT H. BUKER 

Gorgas Hospital 

Canal Zone 



EDWARD R. BURKA 

Presbyterian Hospital 

New York City 




38 




JOHN A. BURLAND 

Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital 

Hanover, New Hampshire 



SUSAN T. CARVER 

New York Hospital 

New York City 




JAMES F. CASEY 

St. Vincent's Hospital 

New York City 



CHARLES W. CHASTAIN 

Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital 

Cooperstown, New York 



LEALAND L. CLARK 

Salt Lake City General Hospital 

Salt Lake City, Utah 



NEIL C. CLEMENTS 

Bellevue Hospital 

New York City 




39 



wmmMmm* 




OLIVER E. COBB 

Presbyterian Hospital 

New York City 



GEORGE V. COCHRAN 

Presbyterian Hospital 

New York City 



RICHARD M. COPENHAVER 

Philadelphia Genera! Hospital 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 




JERE F. DAVIDSON 

Bellevue Hospital 

New York City 



KEITH G. DAWSON 

St. Luke's Hospital 

New York City 




40 




CHARLES L. DONALDSON 
Public Health Service 



DONALD T. DUBIN 

Bronx Municipal Hospital 

Bronx, New York 




LEO J. DUNN 

Cincinnati General Hospital 

Cincinnati, Ohio 



BERNARD EDELSTEIN 

Bronx Municipal Hospital 

Bronx, New York 



JANET S. ELDERKIN 

Bellevue Hospital 

New York City 



SANFORD M. FARRER 

The Mount Sinai Hospital 

New York City 




41 




THOMAS E. FEDEROWICZ 

The Roosevelt Hospital 

New York City 



RONALD FELDMAN 

Bronx Municipal Hospital 

Bronx, New York 




DAVID N. FRANKLIN 

Bellevue Hospital 

New York City 



EDWARD H. FUTTERMAN 

Bellevue Hospital 

New York City 





KENNETH J. GANEM 

Massachusetts Memorial Hospital 

Boston, Massachusetts 



RALPH L. GENTILE 

The Mount Sinai Hospital 

New York City 




42 



DONALD M. GLEASON 

St. Luke's Hospital 

New York City 




ROBERT A. GILBERT 

Univ. of Minnesota Hospital 

Minneapolis, Minn. 




ROBERT L. GOODALE, JR. 
Boston City Hospital 
Boston, Massachusetts 



ARTHUR GREEN 

Bronx Municipal Hospital 

Bronx, New York 



EDGAR HABER 

Massachusetts General Hospital 

Boston, Massachusetts 



BYRON HARDIN 

Presbyterian Hospital 

New York City 




43 




WENDELL B. HATFIELD 

Presbyterian Hospital 

New York City 



WILLIAM V. HEALEY 

Presbyterian Hospital 

New York City 



MARGARET G. HECKMAN 

St. Luke's Hospital 

New York City 



ROBERT H. HERRICK 
San Francisco Hospital 
San Francisco, Calif. 




CHRISTOPHER HODGMAN 

Strong Memorial Hospital 

Rochester, New York 



VINCENT M. HOGAN, JR. 

St. Luke's Hospital 

New York City 




44 




JAROSLAV F. HULKA 

Roosevelt Hospital 

New York City 



SARAN JONAS 

Bellevue Hospital 

New York City 



JERRY C. JACOBS 

Bellevue Hospital 

Mew York City 



fS 



'JH 




DONAL J. KADERABEK 

Bellevue Hospital 

New York City 




MARVIN P. 


JASSIE 


The Mount Sinai Hospita 


New Yor 


< City 


FRED H. 


KATZ 


Presbyterian 


Hospital 


New Yor 


< City 




45 




RICHARD S. KAUFMAN 

The Mount Sinai Hospital 

New York City 



FRED J. LAGOMARSINO 

The Brooklyn Hospital 

Brooklyn, New York 




KURT W. KOHN 

The Mount Sinai Hospital 

New York City 



Bronx Municipal Hospita 
Bronx, New York 



JANET LOU KUEHNER 



NANCY B. KURKE 

St. Elizabeth Hospital 

Washington, D. C. 



JOHN P. LEDDY 
Boston City Hospital 
Boston, Massachusetts 




46 




BURTON J. LEE, III 

Bellevue Hospital 

New York City 



FREDERIC B. LEWIS 

The Mount Sinai Hospital 

New York City 





CLAIRE H. LIACHOWITZ 

Hospital of the Univ. of Penn. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 



YELVA LIPTZIN 

Cook County Hospital 

Chicago, Illinois 



GERALD M. LITZKY 

University of Chicago Clinics 

Chicago, Illinois 



STEPHEN M. LOBELL 

Montefiore Hospital 

Bronx, New York 




47 




■ 




SHIRLEY R. MAHEW 

Rhode Island Hospital 

Providence, Rhode Island 



ROBERT A. MASLANSKY 

Minneapolis General Hospital 

Minneapolis, Minnesota 



PATRICK T. McLOUGHLIN 

Army Medical Service Hospital 

Valley Forge, Pennsylvanio 



CARL F. MEIER 

Albany Hospital 

Albany, New York 




BARNETT M. MILLER 

Bellevue Hospital 

New York City 



JEROME A. MONTANA 
St. Francis Hospital 
Trenton, New Jersey 




^I^H^^99^^^^H 



48 




ROBERT E. MONTROY 

Buffalo General Hospilal 

Buffalo, New York 



JOHN L. MOORE 

Naval Hospitals 

Bethesda, Maryland 




THOMAS J. MOORE 

Presbyterian Hospital 

New York City 



JOHN MULLANEY 

Saginaw General Hospital 

Saginaw, Michigan 



WAYNE A. MYERS 

Bellevue Hospital 

New York City 



HOWARD R. NAY 

Bellevue Hospital 

New York City 




49 




ROBERT J. OSNOS 

University of Chicago Clinics 

Chicago, Illinois 



FREDERICK PASTERNACK 

Jackson Memorial Hospital 

Miami, Florida 



HUGH S. PRATT, JR. 

Naval Hospitals 
San Diego, California 



LOUIS R. PUTNAM 

Cincinnati General Hospital 

Cincinnati, Ohio 





HOWARD M. RADWIN 

Strong Memorial Hospital 

Rochester, New York 



RALPH W. RICHTER 

Roosevelt Hospital 

New York City 




50 




THEODORE ROBINSON 

Passavant Memorial Hospital 

Chicago, Illinois 



JEROME C. ROTHBAUM 

Cincinnati General Hospital 

Cincinnati, Ohio 






LOUIS F. SCIAN 

St. Luke's Hospital 

New York City 



WALTON K. T. SHIM 

The New York Hospital 

New York City 



CHARLES G. SICKLES 

University Hospitals 

Columbus, Ohio 



JOSEPH A. SILVERMAN 

Children's Medical Center 

Boston, Massachusetts 




51 




ARNE L. SKILBRED 

Roosevelt Hospital 

New York City 



ROBERT W. SPEIR 



CHRISTOPHER SPINA 

The Brooklyn Hospital 

Brooklyn, New York 



JOSEPH G. SWEETING 

Presbyterian Hospital 

New York City 




THOMAS J. TARNAY 

Bellevue Hospital 

New York City 



NATHAN S. TAYLOR 

Strong Memorial Hospital 

Rochester, New York 




52 



£1 



•w- 




M. HOWARD TRIEDMAN 

The Mount Sinai Hospital 

New York City 






EDWIN M. TRAYNER 

Roosevelt Hospital 

New York City 





XUAN T. TRUONG 

Indiana University Medical Center 

Indianapolis, Indiana 



CHARLES B. TULEVICH 

Jefferson Davis Hospital 

Houston, Texas 



NANCY DEARMIN TYSON 



ROBERT L. TYSON 

Bronx Municipal Hospital 

Bronx, New York 




53 




ALFRED B. VANDERSLUIS 

Strong Memorial Hospital 

Rochester, New York 



RICHARD A. WALZER 

The Mount Sinai Hospital 

New York City 



DONALD J. WATT 

Strong Memorial Hospital 

Rochester, New York 



WILLIAM P. WEISS 
Boston City Hospital 
Boston, Massachusetts 



r , 





VERNON E. WENDT 

Detroit Receiving Hospital 

Detroit, Michigan 



BARBARA WILLIAMS 

Grace New Haven Community 

Hospital 

New Haven, Connecticut 




54 




FRANK S. WILLIAMS 

Veterans Administration Hospital 

San Francisco, California 



WILLIAM WINNER 

Bronx Municipal Hospital 

Bronx, New York 




MOREY WOSNITZER 

The Mount Sinai Hospital 

New York City 



CLYDE Y. C. WU 

Strong Memorial Hospital 

Rochester, New York 



NICHOLAS YANKOPOULOS 

St. Luke's Hospital 

New York City 



JACK M. YARDLEY 

Indiana University Medical Center 

Indianapolis, Indiana 




55 



Once upon old midnight dreary 
I devise brilliant theory 
To give up glitter world of fashion 
And take to doc'rin with a passion. 
Since first I said "Medicino fino" 
Life's been no bowl of maraschino. 
Friends and neighbors, aunts and cousins 
Plague me daily by the dozens; 
Asking me what led us in 
To the study of medicine. 

On questionnaires, in interviews, 
They try to put you on the screws. 
And every casual visitor 
Becomes a Grand Inquisitor. 
You are strolling in the rain; 
They are knocking on your brain. 
Even, when in sun you're basking 
All around you, they are asking, 
Night and day, around the clock — 
Why do you want to be a DOC? 

You don a smile a la Da Vinici. 

Try to look extremely Spinixi. 

But questioner who sits so sly 

Smirks when you can't tell him why. 

And though your manner's bright and easy 

He's suspecting something sleazy. 

Were you deranged by Schweitzer myth? 

Who slipped you copy "Arrowsmifh"? 

Is it urge to shed light in darkness — 

Or spend hot nights with beauties Harkness? 

Perhaps this be last-ditch attempt 

To make yourself draft exempt. 

Could be you do not get enough 

And must write own Rx. for the Stuff. 

You need some advice for your ideas maniacal? 

You're feeling a little hypochondriacal? 

Perhaps Sertoli cells not up to par — 

Need examining table — afraid in car? 

You're lacking perhaps the requisite stamina? 

You want pretty girl asking you to examine her? 

Is it a case of familial dependence 

Or frankly a matter of oral dependence? 

Is it because your brothers are lawyers 

Your family has sent you the Med. Schol for four 

years? 
Feeling betrodden, defeated and beaten 



Placebo Ergo 



By this sad excuse for curious cretin. 
I retrace my steps in miserable pout 
Till, gaining courage, soul lashes out. 
Onward to where can get question answered 
To Heights, The Heights! O vision rancid! 

In gleaming glory, saw Cloisters lights — 

Damn, oh damn that tram — wrong Heights. 

Then thirty blocks lower and somewhat abashed, 

In other part of forest was cached 

A brilliant fortress of stone and brain 

The home of hunt, the mecca of pain. 

Here would answer come to one 

Why M.D., not business, my son? 

I enter always open door — 

Relinquishing all hope — and more. 

Into lab. to fence with muscle; 

Find out how ticks red corpuscle. 

Soon vision becomes extremely myopic 

From views of materia microscopic. 

With carmen, violet and fuscia 

Learning much about minutia. 

My thoughts ran to the heavens true 

And I painted my blood with — (Ed. note: T-l 824) 

I saw how hookworm minus hook looks 

Made colored stews with biochem. cookbooks. 




56 



Summa 



To make pictures just like life. 

Learn to thump, feel, touch and squeeze. 

Lubadub. Lubadub, "deep breath, please." 

Spend two years on science basic 

Still the patients manage to stay sick. 



Played with dog, frog, rabbit, kitten. 
Learned first rule — "Bite first or be bitten." 
Drank concoctions — bitter, vile. 
Soon producing homegrown Nile. 
Enduring enough hardships to make Hazel flag- 
While breathing my last on Douglas bag. 
Was taught to correlate via Clinics 
But still was not secure from cynics. 
To my queries came replies — 

"Ask no questions — get no lies." 

Try again in Second Year. 

Could be answer lurking here? 

Try to learn a hundred bugs 

And how to use the "wonder drugs." 

Strepto stapho-cocci all 

Lemon in your viral highball? 

Rose, O Rose, bacterial flower, 

Why a countence so sour? 

Delve in seaweed from Sargossa — 
Lead existence sub-serosa — 
Sharpen pencils with a knife, 




After two, no answer see. 

Guess I have to try for three. 

Play with secretions — sweat, tears, manure. 

Our biological soup de jour. 

With ease we solve the mysteries 

Of taking Atchley histories; 

A little symptoms, a little chatter 

With the emphasis on the latter. 

Tramp, tramp, tramp thru city streets 

Tracing history of spirochetes. 

Learn to build with great elation, 

Both Public Health and Comfort Station. 

In "affaires de coeur," they fall 

When I seduce with pentothal. 

Learn to stand in silent awe 

As parts of patient fall to floor. 

Make loads of analytic dollars 

Heeding creed — "Sexualis uber allis." 

If the patient's paranoid 

Give him serpasil and Freud. 

If he's really off his rocks, 

TLC and fifty shocks. 

With just a little more in store 
Make final sprint for number Four. 
And here I learn one solemn fact 
Against me all the cards are stacked. 
Patients tell ME what makes them tick — 
But tell Attendings what makes them sick. 
Tho' I'm maintaining air professional, 
I find I'm running clinic confessional. 
And when I uncover social strata 
I become "persona non grata." 

But I have miles to go before — 
I put my shingle on my door. 
So if you really want to know, 
To Med. School you will have to go. 
But if you choose to stay at home, 
Write a novel; read a poem. 
Stay away from hidden danger — 
Be a friend not as a stranger. 
And yours is but accept and sigh, 
And never ask the reason why. 



57 




Now bear down. 








4th 


Year Bladder Tumor 
Proiecl 

Student: No Data 


Name of 
No Da 


Patient: No Data 

a 












■ s - e 












w 











59 




^> 



i li 

Before March 12th we didn't have the guts to leave this one out. 



You say you're feeling badly? 



e 




It's such a problem educating the mosses. 





Dr. Albert Grokoest and Dr. Hans T. Clarke. 



A 



Think Montana, think, what is it? 

Something that you or I might have? 

What is it boy? 



Between you and me I don't give a damn about high blood ' My door is 
pressure. f always open. 




61 




Some have 







Dean; I m afraid I won t be interning next year. 




63 




Seven times. is all ri M ... — — o — - 
hour between each one. 



I tell you Wern, wh 



hen Xuan do stool on me all he find are diomom 



Hi H_ 






■ Phy sit 



65 





66 



1956 Statistics 



Number of students in class 1 16 

Number of married students 36 

Number of students who will be married by June, 1956 16 

Total number of children in class 22 

Number of children on the way (according to the Latest Cafeteria Gossip Poll) 7 

Fathers of the Year Hugh Pratt and William Heady 

Mother of the Year Nancy Dearmin Tyson 

Biggest Surprise of the Year Ken's three ovulating mice 

Besl Kept Secret of Two Years Jan's Toronto lawyer 




Ralph and Evlelyn. 



Nat and Dorothy. 




Nancy and Bob. 



v 



/ 



David, Nancy and tynda. 



Jerry and Barbara. 




^ 



t 

/ 




Kit and Johannc 



Wendell, Charlotte and Christopher. 



so and Betty. 







■ 

:■..■ 










II" 

1 


i 


^P^y^ 


I 




j 






P^ j 




■- "l 




1 9 










■ T^.-^ 













70 




Standing — Niel Clements, Saron Jonas. Seated — Art Green, Barbara Williams, Sue Carver, Howard Nay. 

Yearbook Staff 

Editor: Barbara Williams 

Business Managers.- Susan Carver, Charles Donaldson 

Distributing Editor: Margaret Heckman 
Howard Nay Edith Bramwell 

Don Watt Janet Kuehner 

Jeannette Hovsepian Claire Liachowitz 

Robert Hirsch Niel Clements 

Louis Putnam Saran Jonas 

Art Editor: J. Alexis Burland 

Literary Editors: Ed Futterman, Ted Robinson, Arthur Green 

Photography: Richard Kaufman, Nathan Taylor 

Third Year. Sterling Tignor, Sue Kessler 

Second Year: Norman Talal, Samuel H. Barondes, Jim Hastings, Virginia Dulaney 

First Year: Ira Kanter, Paul Lietman, Mary Jane Jesse 



71 




P&S 
Club 



P&S CLUB EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Seated, left to right — Charles Bucknam, 
'57, Vice-President; Ralph Richter, '56, 
President; Mr. Edwin M. Barton, Director. 
Standing — Associate Dean Aura E. Sev- 
eringhaus, Vice-Chairman, Board of Ad- 
visors, and Dr. George A, Perera, Chair- 
man, Board of Advisors. Not in picture — 
Dr. William S. Longford, Treasurer, and 
Howard Roffwarg, '58, Secretary. 



FOR 61 years the P&S Club has presented a program to meet the social, spiritual 
and recreational needs of the whole student body. This year its officers have been 
Ralph Richter, President; Charles Bucknam, Vice President; and Howard Roffwarg, 
Secretary. Mr. Edwin M. Barton has served as Director of Student Activities. 

The Athletic program led by Howard Nay and Warren Seides includes an un- 
defeated varsity basketball team, squash team, and intramural tournaments. The 
Concer; Committee, Byron Hardin chairman, sponsored four recitals by leading artists 
to capacity Bard Hall audiences. The Annual Christmas Party and the Spring Festival 
were the social highlights of the school year. Coffee dances, picnics and a square 
dance were held by the Bard-Maxwell Committee with Robert Reiss, Chairman. The 
P&S Club is proud also of its Student-Faculty Dinners and discussions, monthly 
theater parties with Robert Gilbert in charge, bi-monthly movies — Ned Brown, chair- 
man, and its annual book and clothing drive for Korean Medical Schools led by 
Clyde Wu. 

The weekly Vesper Services under the leadership of Charles Donaldson have been 
an outstanding contribution to the Medical Center. They featured nationally known 
clergymen and educators and a 40 voice choir with Al Mathies, director. In March, 
another Forum on Religion and Medicine was held with delegates from many theo- 
logical and medical schools attending. 

Behind the P&S Club program stands an active faculty Board of Advisors with 
Dr. George A. Perera, Chairman; Dr. Aura E. Severinghaus, Vice-Chairman; and 
Dr. William S. Langford, Treasurer. 



72 






SrgpS 


f )t 





Front row, left to right — Pier Moncusi-Ungaro, Neil Clements, Ed Danielski, Jock Sciarra, Charles Bucknam, Ted 
Bronsome, Carl Meier. Second row — Dick Watson, John SchiefTelin, Morey Wosnitzer, Joe Silverman, Boud Stimson, 
Roy Brown, Rick Ridlon, Tom Morley, Carl Weiss. Back row— Sterling Tignor, Dick White, Bill Snyder, Jim Hardy, 
Bill Atwood, Skip Nay, Jim Brown, Ben Santoro. Members not present— FOURTH YEAR: Dave Andrews, Paul Black, 
Pal Brodsky, Ned Brown, Ed Burka, Al Burland, Charles Chastain, King Curtis, Jere Davidson, Keith Dawson, Charles 
Donaldson, Don Gleason, Bob Goodale, Bill Healy, Bob Hirsch, Chris Hodgmon, Burt Lee, Bruce Lewis, Tom Moore, 
Fred Posternack, Lou Putnam, Howard Radwin, Arnie Skillbred, Tom Federowiti, Howard Triedman, Bob Tyson, Charles 
Tulevitch. THIRD YEAR: Bob Ambrose, Bob Bertsch, John Hermann, Dick Hyde, Moses Mahoi, John Rathe, John Rich- 
ardson, John Roberts, Bodley Stites, Ralph Wharton, Bill Wheeler. SECOND YEAR: Bob Blahut, Jerry Dougan, Randy 
Harris, Dick Hnat, Don Hofreuter, Ron Miller, Ben Santoro, Bill Snyder, Bob Van Cleve. FIRST YEAR: Earl Byrne, Bill 
Burks, Nelson Cantwell, Mai Edgar, Bill Giainger, Borre Gudmundsen, Carl MacDonald, Bart McHugh, Gos Middleton, 
Joe Myers, Rich Prescott, George Munsick, Norm Roome. 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



John J. Sciarra 

Charles A. Bucknam 

Edwin D. Bransome, Jr. 

Edward F. Danielski, Jr. 



Socio/ Chairmen 

Herrick C. Riddlan and Richard L. White 

Keg-Keepers Richard F. Hnat and Don H. Hofreuter 

Rushing Chairman Boudinot Stimson, Jr. 



N 

N 



DURING the past year lota Chapter of NU Sigma Nu under the leadership of 
president Jack Sciarra and backed by vice president Bucknam and treasurer 
Danielski has put forth its best efforts to assure that attaining a medical education 
will not be all work. 

The social year included several strikingly successful monthly Bard Hall dances 
which climaxed with the inter-chapter Aesculapian Ball early in March. Conspicu- 
ously involved in the party department were impresarios Riddlon and White, cork- 
drawers Hovat and Hofreuter, and publicity-planner Ted Bransome. Our semi-annual 
intra-fraternity "free drinks" parties were as usual overwhelmingly attended and 
have become established as a fraternal hallmark. 

At the 63rd annual initiation banquet of lota Chpter the new members were 
formally welcomed by Dr. Yale Kneeland, Jr. (lota '26) whose sketches on the 
progress of medicine and medical education were received with great enthusiahm 
by all. 

Taking past gatherings and projected plans into consideration, it will have been 
a year of many happy associations in Nu Sigma Nu. 



74 



THIS year the Upsilon Sigma chapter of Phi Chi featured two excellent dinner 
meetings and a number of informal fraternity parties. Phi Chi at P & S traditionally 
sponsors a series of dinner meetings throughout the year at which time outstanding 
individuals from the medical world and without are invited to attend and address 
the chapter. Dr. George Humphreys II, Valentine Mott Professor of Surgery at P & S, 
was the fraternity's guest at the Fall meeting. Dr. Humphrey's talk entitled "Some 
Moss Gathered by a Rolling Surgeon" was based on visits to medical schools in 
foreign countries. In presenting a survey of medical education throughout the world, 
the surgeon took his audience on a kodachrome slide tour of many interesting South 
American, Asian and Middle Eastern countries. 

The speaker of our Winter Dinner meeting was Dr. Charles M. Steer, Associate 
Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology, who spoke on the history of the 
Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. Besides being an outstanding gynecologist, 
Dr. Steer is also a scholar of medical history and his amusing discussion of the trials 
and tribulations that P&S has faced down through the years made for a wonderfully 
enjoyable evening. 



<t> 

X 



Standing, left to right — Clyde Wu, C. Evans Roberts, George Drake, Ronald Feldman, John Boname, John Brackett, 
Fred Edelman. Sifting, left to right— Robert Wolzer, Vincent Bono, Alfred Vandersluis, President; Charles Sickles. Not 
present for picture — David Befeler, Peter Barry, Ray Bartlett, James Casey, Lealand Clark, Richard Copenhover, Roberl 
Gilbert, Donal Kaderabec, Richard Kaufman, Fred lagomarsino, Robert Maslonsky, Ted Strehan, Ralph Richler, Donald 
Wott, Vernon Wendt, Gordon Brown, Hugo Deaton, Herbert Cooper, Robert Crago, Al Lazersan, Karl Pervin, Norman Talal. 






vi i pen i b 

or mii 
COLLCCC or PHYSICIANS and surgeons 

on i. i.i liMlilMm DIM UH 

^^tJIII I VI'II\IM 

II iJ^^^ISl'IT VI. 

Jl^ , Jhis tai 

"iii. iiv T^ 

I M) M I MOT 

■S hn of 111 

M \\ MOI 
• M (tlT BV 

mi s r 







1 



iiikii or HitnrviMT nisi >m 

WHII I SIHVIM, l\ | HI 

r< mj^iosrrrxi.s <»K \i:\\ \okk 
,HI8 TABLETi 

Wf\r ,K MKMUIM »l 

US OF III \1| 

M \\ Not on: , 
\ I I.HT II V : '*i % 
• M l.s (ir Till: 

'"I TO HA T 




VNl> #■ 





Top row f/ef ^ to right — Fred Zuckerman, Karl Burger, Robert Schaefer, Hans Baruch. Boffom row — Stanley 
Finke, Norman Ertel, Donald Gerber. Not in picture — Ronald Alt man, Steven Barrett, Robert Grossman, 
Earle Hammer, Marvin Jasse, Fred Katz, Ronald Linsky, Barnett Miller, Robert Osnos, Theodore Robinson, 

Arthur Strauss. 



OFFICERS 



A 



Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Scribe 

Treasurer 

Historian 

Senior Senators 



Norman Ertel 

Stanley Finke 

Carl Burger 

Donald Gerber 

Robert Schaeffer 

Fred Katz, Robert Osnos 



E 



THE Gamma Chapter of Phi Delta Epsilon has continued its fine program of social 
and educational events this year. As usual the Clay Ray Murray Lecture was the 
season's high point. Dr. Claude Beck spoke on "The Surgical Treatment of Coronary 
Artery Disease" to an enthusiastic audience after a dinner and cocktail party in his 
honor. 



The national convention at Detroit provided a pleasant (and intoxicating) interlude 
in the school year for our delegates. In addition, the usual parties and lectures 
have been as enjoyable as ever. 



76 




First row — Gerald M. litzky, Edith M. Bra m well, Edgar Haber, Marvin P. Jassie, Officers. Second row — 

Marianne Beatrice, Susan T. Carver, Janet S. Elderkin. Third row — Robert L. Tyson, David L. Andrews, 

Howard Tried man, Joseph G. Sweeting, John Leddy, Edward Burka; Fred Katz. Absent — Hans H. Baruch, 

Donald T. Dubin, Stephen M. Lobell, Thomas J. Tornay, Richard A. Walzer, Christopher Spina. 



Alpha Omega Alpha 



ALPHA OMEGA ALPHA is the national medical honor society 
which has had an active chapter at P & S since 1 907. The 
initials A.O.A. are derived from the first letters of the three Greek 
words meaning "To be worthy to serve the suffering." The society 
generally aims to foster the scientific and philosophic aspects of 
medicine. If encourages research and attempts to recognize those 
who have made a particular contribution to medicine or its allied 
fields. 

Twice each year a formal banquet is held, where candidates 
chosen on the basis of scholarship, in the broadest sense, as well 
as promise of intellectual growth, expectancy of leadership, and 
moral character, are inducted into the society. A traditional part of 
the ceremonies is the induction of a physician who has achieved 
prominence in research or practice as an honorary member, as well 
as an address by a distinguished speaker. 



OFFICERS 

President 
Edgar Haber 

Vice-President 
Edith M. Bramwell 

Secretary 
Hans H. Baruch 

Treasurer 
Marvin P. Jassie 

Banquet Manager 
Gerald M. Litzky 



77 



The Honor Committee 



THIS marks the first year that the entire student body at P & S is under one unified 
student initiated, student written, and student run Honor System; an accomplish- 
ment for which the Class of 1956 can feel justifiably proud. The idea of a student 
Honor Code began four years ago when several members of the Class of 1955 
attempted to establish an honor system in their class. As with all new ideas and 
changes in tradition, their efforts met with some resistance. However, the Class of 
1956, quick to show their great wisdom even as first year students, quickly accepted 
the plan the next fall. 

Each successive incoming class has adopted some form of an honor code with the 
result that last year every class was functioning under an Honor System. In order to 
unify these various systems and to establish a school-wide tradition, the Student 
Council created a committee composed of the various class officers assigned to the 
task of writing a new Honor Code and a system for its regulation. This new Honor 
Code has now been accepted by all classes at P & S, has received the blessing of 
the faculty, and will automatically be in effect for all future classes. Unlike the Greek 
Goddess of Wisdom, this Honor Code did not spring forth fully formed, but will need 
certain changes as experience dictates. However, the basic form now is in operation 
thanks to the continued interest and hard work of the members of the Class of 1956. 



First Year: George Wilson 
Orlando Miller 

Second Year: Ronald Miller 

Boudinot Stimson 



Third Year: Mayo Johnson 
Ralph Wharton 

Fourth Year: Janet Kuehner 

Charles Donaldson 



Left to right — Ronald Miller, Boudinot Stimson, Charles Donaldson, George Wilson. Nor present for 
picture — Orlando Miller, Janet Kuehner, Mayo Johnson, Ralph Wharton. 




78 



Student 
Council 



First row — William Heady, Presi- 
dent; Mary Ellen Beck, Mary 
Jane Jesse, Robert Sherry. Sec- 
ond row — Brown Dennis, Charles 
Neave, Dick Prescott, Bill Burkes, 
Don Gerber. Members not 
present — Nelson Cortwell, Bob 
Bertsch, Dwtght Robinson, Marcia 
Bilbao. 




THE Student Council is the official legislative body of the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons. It is composed of the officers of the four classes with the President of 
the Senior Class presiding. Dr. Rappleye and Dr. Severinghaus are members of the 
council ex officio. The council concers itself with problems in the student sphere and 
in matters of student-faculty relations. 



The members of the Resident's Council for 1956-1957 are: Ellyn Jones, Martin 
Smith, Don Hofeuter, Thomas Shea, James Franklin, Richard Baum, James Hardy, 
Carlton MacDonald. 

Dean's Appointment at Large: Susan Carver, Brown Dennis, Hugo Deaton, Fred 
Pittman. 



Residents 
Council 



left to right — Brown Dennis, 

Claire Liachowitz, Susan Carver, 

Gerald Litzky. 





Student 

Faculty 

Social 

Committee 



First row — Put. Brodsky, Mory 
Jane Jesse, John Roberts. Sec- 
ond row — Rob. Campbell, Cal. 
Edgar, Bill Weir. Not present 
for picture — Janet Kuehner, Carl 
Lyle. 



THE Student-Faculty Social Committee is a group of students which plans the cock- 
tail party and dinner that precedes the meetings of the Columbia-Presbyterian 
Medical Society. These informal cocktail parties provide an opportunity for student 
and faculty to meet on a nonacademic basis, and ore attended enthusiastically by all. 



THE P & S "varsity" basketball team has played close to twenty games during the 
past three years the record is still clean — no losses. The opposition has been pro- 
vided largely by other medical schools — Cornell, NYU, New York Medical College, 
Long Island Medical School, and Yale. The team has also played various teams from 
service outfits and other graduate schools. Perhaps the most memorable contest was 
the game with Sing Sing (played at Sing Sing] in which our boys came through with 
a very close win over the prisoners. With the help of the P & S Club the varsity 
schedule will continue to improve in the coming years, and it may even provide com- 
petition stiff enough so that P & S may lose a game. 

Note should be made that Howard Nay, who was absent for the picture, has taken 
a large part in his four years in organizing the team and schedule, and has been 
outstanding in his efforts on the team to maintain the winning recorr. 



N 

W 




Team 
Basketball 



First row — Robert Leoch, Jerome 
Rothboum, Charles Bucknam, 
Lewis Arnow. Second row — Wil- 
liam Kane, Warren Sides, Ken 
Spitzer, Neil Clements, Mike 
Lazor, Arlan Gottlieb. 



Omega 
Club 

First row — Brown Dennis, Charles 
Buckman, David Andrews, Saran 
Jonas, John Roberts. Second 
row — Robert Campbell, Putnam 
Brodsky, Tom Federowicz, Tom 
Moore, Howard Nay. Members 
not present — Larry Boies, Roy 
Brown, Charles Burkhart, Alexis 
Burlaid, King Curtis, Jerry Dou 
gan, Bill Healy, John Hitchcock, 
Randy Harris, Mike Hogan, Bill 
Hopewell, Mayo Johnson, Ted 
Johnson, Gene Kelly, Mike La- 
zon, Burt Lee, Carl Lyle, Barney 
Miller, Vert Mooney, Ray Mut- 
ter, Charles Neave, Pete Orns- 
by, Lou Putnam, Bill Plangos, 
D wight Robinson, Ben Santoro, 
Tom Shea, Bob Sherry, Bob 
Speir, Bondley Stiles, Boud, Stim- 
son, Al Toole, Bob Van Cleve, 
Bob Wallace. 




THE Omega Club is a society composed of forty-five undergraduates from the sec- 
ond, third and fourth year classes, faculty members and about six hundred gradu- 
ate physicians practicing throughout the country. Founded in 1892, its activities have 
alternated between academic and social functions. During the past few years they 
have been chiefly social and have consisted of several cocktail parties each year 
and an annual banquet. The President is Harvey Zarem. 



1956 is the tenth anniversary of the founding of that renowned P & S singing 
group, the Bards. Since the idea of a fraternity of medical minstrels was first con- 
ceived, the Bards traditionally hold tryouts in the early part of each year and elect 
a small group of first-year men to replace the graduating members. The latter men 
become part of an active Bards Alumni who join with student members several times 
each year at the Christmas Party; and the annual alumni dinner to renew old songs 
and old times. 

The Bards spread their entertaining abilities far and wide by singing at various 
women's colleges throughout the East. They have in the past made record albums 
which have met with wonderful success. A toast to the Bards: Long life to a group 
which combines song, laughter, wine, women — and medicine with outstanding ease. 



Bard! 



Co-Directors: 

Robert B. Ambrose 
William C. Rhangos 

Business Manager: 
Robert G. Campbell 

Lefi to righi — Robert Ambrose, 
George Storm, Kendall Kane, 
David Befeler, Gene Phillip;; 
Paul Lietman. Not pictured — 
Benjamin Santoro, Manuel 
Hinds, John Davis, John Hitch- 
cock, William Rhangos. 




Patrons—Faculty 



Dr 


Hattie Alexander 


Dt 


. Robert F. Loeb 


Dr 


Harry Altman 


Dr 


. H. Houston Merritt 


Dr 


George C. Andrews 


Dr 


. Rustin Mcintosh 


Dr 


Virginia Apgar 


Di 


. J. Lowry Miller 


Dr 


Dana W. Atchley 


Di 


. Dabney Moon-Adams 


Dr 


Frederick R. Bailey 


D 


.E. W. Munnell 


Dr 


Harold G. Baker 


D 


. Carl T. Nelson 


Dr 


William Bauman 


Dr 


.C. Paul O'Connell 


Dr 


Arthur Blakemore 


D 


. E. M. Papper 


Dr 


Harold W. Brown 


D 


. Charles A. Perera 


Dr 


Gordon M. Bruce 


D 


. George A. Perera 


Dr 


H.T. Clark 


D 


. Calvin H. Plimpton 


Dr 


H. P. Cooper 


D 


.J. L. Pool 


Dr 


W. M. Copenhaver 


D 


. Milton R. Portor 


Dr 


. Stuart W. Cosgriff 


D 


. Charles Ragan 


Dr 


. Felix E. Demartini 


D 


. Helen M. Raney 


Dr 


. Richard B. Duane, Jr. 


D 


. Dickinson Richards 


Dr 


J. Dunnington 


D 


. Conrad Riley 


Dr 


. R. H. E. Elliott, Jr. 


D 


. Harry M. Rose 


Dr 


. M. Irene Ferrar 


Di 


. Thomas V. Santulli 


Dr 


' Charles A. Flood 


D 


. John E. Scarff 


Dr 


. Winifred Franklin 


D 


. R. N. Schullinger 


Dr 


Alexander Garcia 


D 


. Lawrence C. Sloan 


Dr 


C. D. Haagensen 


D 


. Alan M. A. Smith 


Dr 


. David B. Habif 


D 


. A. Southam 


Dr 


. Franklin M. Hanger 


D 


. H. Southworth 


Dr 


Reyjane M. Harvey 


D 


. William Spring 


Dr 


. Frederick P. Herter 


D 


. W. B. Stewart 


Dr 


. Hilary H. Holmes 


D 


. Frank Stinchfield 


Dr 


William Horwitz 


D 


. Juan Tavaras 


Dr 


. Caldron Howe 


D 


. Howard Taylor 


Dr 


. George Humphreys 


D 


. T. L. Tyson 


Dr 


. George W. Fish 


D 


. H. B. van Dyke 


Dr 


. Franz Kallman 


D 


. Jules V. Waltner 


Dr 


. Emanuel B. Kaplan 


D 


. Harry F. Wechsler 


Dr 


. H. D. Keston 




and 4 P&S Alumni 


Dr 


. Lawrence C. Kolb 


D. 


. Josephine Wells 


Dr 


. M. J. Lepore 


Di 


. James A. Wolff 



82 



Patrons— Parents of Class of 1956 



Mr. Elmore L. Andrews 
Shaker Heights, Ohio 

Mr. Edward Barry 
Manhasset, N. Y. 

Dr. A. A. Beatrice 
Bristol, Conn. 

Mr. S. L. Black 
Newton, Mass. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Bramwell 
New York City 

Mrs. Lee B. Booth 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Mr. and Mrs. William V. Carver 
Madison, Conn. 

Mr. James F. Casey 
Forest Hills, N. Y. 

Mr. Bernard Davidson 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Mrs. Marjorie Dawson 
New York City 

Mr. R. M. Dearmin 
Indianapolis, Ind. 

Mrs. Phyllis Donaldson 
New York City 

Mr. A. Leo Dunn 
Kings Park, N. Y. 

Mrs.G. W. Elderkin 
Princeton, N. J. 

Mrs. Sophie Feldman 
Flushing, N. Y. 

Mr. Vincent Gentile 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Mr. J. O. Gilbert 
Trotwood, Ohio 



Mrs. Robert L. Goodale 
Cambridge, Mass. 

Mr. Harold B. Hatfield 
Denver, Colo. 

Mr. J. H. Heckman 
New York City 

Mr. John A. Hovsepian 
New York City 

Dr. Sidney Hirsch 
Cedarhurst, N. Y. 

Dr. J.H. Hulka 

Long Island City, N. Y. 

Mr. Myron Jonas 
New York City 

Dr. Erwin J. Kaderabek 
New Symnta Beach, Fla. 



Mr. and Mrs. S. Pettit 
Queens Village, N. Y. 

Mr. Donald H. Putnam 
Ashland, Ky. 

Dr. Leo Radwin 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Dr. William Robinson 
New York City 

Mrs. Betty Rothbaum 
Elmont, N. Y. 

The Rev. Canon Wai On Shim 
Honolulu, Hawaii 

Mr. Lars Skilbred 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Sweeting 
Flushing, N. Y. 



Mr. Samuel S. Kaufman 


Mr. Joseph Tarney 




Shaker Heights, Ohio 


Hastings-on-ihe-Hudson, N. Y. 


Dr. H. G. Kuehner 


Mrs. Mary Tulevech 




Pittsburgh, Penna. 


Great Neck, L. 1. 




Mr. W. Stanley Lawrence 


Mr. Jess Vandersluis 




Lindenberg, Penna. 


Cleveland, Ohio 




Dr. A. T. Liachowitz 


Mr. Richard Walzer 




Mahanoy City, Penna. 


New York City 




Dr. L. David Lobell 


Dr. A. H. Watt 




Jackson Heights, L. 1. 


New York City 




Dr. M. M. Maslansky 


Mrs. Alice S. Weiss 




White Plains, N. Y. 


New York City 




Mr. Lippman Miller 


Dr. Raymond Wendt 




Jersey City, N. J. 


Cleveland, Ohio 




Mr. Abram J. Moore 


Mrs. A. S. Williams 




Westwood, Mass. 


East Orange, N. J. 




Dr. Christopher Montana 


Mrs. Ethel Wosnitzer 




Oyster Bay, N. Y. 


Newark, N. J. 




83 








THE AMERICAN JOURNAL 
OF MEDICINE 

Presents university medicine at its 
besM Features timely seminars, 
symposia and hospital staff confer- 
ences. Fact-filled reports on every 
new development in the field of 
Medicine. 200 pages Monthly — 10th 
Year of publication. 

$12 U. S. A., $13 Canada, $15 
Foreign. 



THE AMERICAN JOURNAL 
OF CLINICAL NUTRITION 

The only periodical of its kind 
prepared for the doctor in practice 
— family physician or specialist. 
Within its pages are the latest 
data dealing with dietary problems 
— written authoritatively — presents 
our world wide knowledge of nu- 
trition. 100 pages Bimonthly — a new 
publication. 

S8 U. S. A., $8.50 Canada, $9 
Foreign. 



THE AMERICAN JOURNAL 
OF SURGERY 

Publishes papers of the Pacific 
Coast Surgical Association, The 
American Association for the Sur- 
gery of Trauma, The American 
Proctologic Society and The Amer- 
ican Society of Maxillofacial Sur- 
geons. 200 pages Monthly — 65th 
Year of Publication. 



$15 U. S. 



A., $16 Canada, $17 

Foreign. 



THE YORKE PUBLISHING COMPANY, INC. 



49 WEST 45th STREET 
NEW YORK 36, N. Y. 




84 



THE MEDICAL CENTER BOOKSTORE 

Extends Its Sincerest Good Wishes 

to 

THE CLASS OF 1956 



Compliments 



of 



BARD HALL 



85 



™ nrra 7 Tarr 



Studios Inc. 



Portrait Photographers 



9 WEST 46th STREET 

NEW YORK CITY 
Circle 5-6684 



86 



THE NEW ENGLAND 
JOURNAL OF MEDICINE 

Special Rate for Medical Students 
Interns and Residents 

$5.00 per Year 



Courtesy Cards 

CENTER PHARMACY 

Prescription Specialists 

All our EYE prescriptions tripple filtered, sterile 
distilled water used. Electrical mixers and 
homogonizers used on dermatological ointments 
and lotions. 

WAdsworth 3-1258 
4301 BROADWAY 

Between 168th and 169th Streets 
NEW YORK 32, N. Y. 

Remember this seal . . . 




It stands for 

practical texts and manuals 

by outstanding men 

and journals that bring you current 

advances in specialized fields. 

Write for complete catalog. 

Grune & Stratton, Inc. 

Medical Publishers 

381 FOURTH AVENUE 
NEW YORK 16, N. Y. 



WESTCHESTER FARMS, Inc. 



430 EAST 108th STREET 
NEW YORK 29, N. Y. 



HEIGHTS 
CAMERA CENTER 

The Leading Brands in Photographic 

Equipment and Supplies 

AT SPECIAL PRICES 

The Finest Quality in Photo Finishing 
Done on Premises 



1229 ST. NICHOLAS AVENUE 

Between 171st and 172nd Streets 

NEW YORK 32, N. Y. 



87 



REME RESTAURANT 

Food of Distinction 
4021 BROADWAY 

Corner 169th Street 
NEW YORK CITY 

Air Conditioned 



CHRIS' FLOWERS 

Flowers for All Occasions 
4029 BROADWAY 

Between 169th and 170th Streets 
WA 7-5314 



THE JOURNAL OF 
CLINICAL INVESTIGATION 



Special Subscription Rates for 
Students, Interns and Residents 



Presbyterian Hospital, 
8th Floor, Room 134 



622 WEST 168th STREET 

NEW YORK 32, N. Y. 



WAdsworth 7-5700 



Lie. 532 



M. CITARELLA, Inc. 

Wines and Liquors 
Visit Our Wine Cellar 

3915 BROADWAY 

Near 164th Street 
NEW YORK 32, N. Y. 



ALL GARMENTS INSURED 

For Prompt Call and Delivery Service 

Call WAshington Heights 7-3884 

DAVE APPEL 

Expert Tailor and Furrier 
Cleaners and Dyers 

230 FT. WASHINGTON AVE. 

Between 169th and 170th Streels 



SELBY L. TURNER 

Life Member of Leader's Association 

Specialist in Insurance for 
Professional Men 



233 BROADWAY 

NEW YORK 7, N. Y. 
BEekman 3-6620 



88 



WA 3-2424 "Say II With Flowers" 

MEDICAL CENTER 
FLOWER SHOP 

CARDASIS, INC., FLORIST 

Arfistic Decorations For All Occasions 

The Flower Shop Nearest Medical Center 

"WE TELEGRAPH FLOWERS" 

4003 BROADWAY 

At 168th Street 

NEW YORK 32, N. Y. 


JOHN W. BUNGER 

GROCER 

Fruits and Vegetables 

226 FORT WASHINGTON AVE. 
Corner 169th Street 




SILVER PALM 
LUNCHEONETTE 

4001 BROADWAY 
Corner 168th Street 


ELBERON CLEANERS 
LAUNDERERS 

Serving Bard Hall 

Excellent Service — Priced Right 

4015 BROADWAY 
S. W. Corner 169th Street 
WAshington Heights 7-1753 




Haircut or a Manicure 

V. LA PORTA & SON 

SIX EXPERTS 

4005 BROADWAY 

Near 1 69th Street 

WA 8-4910 

THE BARBER SHOP NEAREST 
THE MEDICAL CENTER 


THE FRIENDLY SHOP 

Social and Commercial Stationery and 
Greeting Cards 

4007 BROADWAY 
WA 3-9115 




UPTOWN WINE & LIQUOR STORE 

4056 BROADWAY 

at 171st Street 
LOrraine 8-2100 


WAshington Heights 7-3233 

LARRY ORIN 

JEWELER 
Electronically Tested Watch Repairs 

4009 BROADWAY 
NEW YORK 32, N. Y. 

Special Discounts for Hospital Personnel 




We Cater for All Occasions 
5. & R. DELICATESSEN 

4020 BROADWAY 
WA 3-0700 





89 



Best Wishes for a 
Happy Future 

MALCOLM D. HUBERT 

C. L. U. 

Life Insurance 

for the 

Medical Profession 

342 MADISON AVENUE 

NEW YORK 17, N. Y. 
MUrray Hill 7-5560 



Same Day Service LO 8-1900 

BARD CLEANERS, Inc. 

Quality French Cleaning 
Plant on Premises 

1170 ST. NICHOLAS AVENUE 

(At Broadway and 168lh Street) 
NEW YORK 32, N. Y. 

Compliments of 

THE TROPICAL GARDENS 
BAR AND RESTAURANT 

169th STREET and BROADWAY 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

WAdsworth 3-8918 



Acknowledgments 



Sincerest thanks from the Editorial Staff 

To all who made our Yearbook possible — 

Especially — 

To the parents of the Fourth Year Class for their encouragement and financial aid. 

To the faculty of the College of Physicians and Surgeons for their generous financial 
support. 

To the staff of the Medical Center Bookstore for their assistance in the distrbution 
and sales of the Yearbook. 

To Mr. Robert Kelly and his staff for their wonderful encouragement and assistance 
in publishing our Yearbook. 

To Mr. Murray Tarr for his portraits, candids, and group pictures. 

To the P & S Club for its help with Yearbook correspondence. 

To students and friends of P & S who contributed pictures, suggestions, and 
encouragement — 



90 



._^- ■ 




^m 






, ; ,. .. !i;i ;! ■ ,;i: .„ |||il 












■:.;.''■:■■■;. 






























: : :' - ':':. '■ ' ■ ■■■ 







^iitillllil